ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 2 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218.


Cracks are seen in a carpark in front of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing.   REUTERS/David Gray     (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)

Check Out The Abandoned Wonderland Of China

Although all of us know and have experienced the amazing magnificence of Disneyland in Shanghai; very few of us know about this another amusement park that was in the making during the late 1900’s. This park was known as ‘Wonderland’ and it was supposedly going to be the grandest and biggest amusement park in China. That was up until the construction had to stop due to certain land ownership concerns, that sprung up. That’s where the construction stopped and the park was abandoned as it stood. Up until 2013, when the park was said to be demolished yet, there are still some unfinished remains for those with a love for archaeology can go visit.

Check the eerie pictures of this place, which could have been something great.

ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 7 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218. A view of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 13 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218. A crack is seen in a footpath leading to an abandoned building that was to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)

ATTENTION EDITORS -- THIS IMAGE IS 8 of 18 TO ACCOMPANY A PICTURE PACKAGE ON AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK NEAR BEIJING. SEARCH KEYWORD "WONDERLAND" TO SEE ALL IMAGES PXP201-218. A view of abandoned buildings that were to be part of an amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS SOCIETY CONSTRUCTION)

Footsteps in fresh snow are seen across a walkway leading to the entrance of a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)

A view of an entrance to an abandoned building which leads into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)

The entrance to an abandoned building leads into a derelict amusement park called 'Wonderland', on the outskirts of Beijing December 5, 2011. Construction work at the park, which was promoted by developers as 'the largest amusement park in Asia', stopped around 1998 after funds were withdrawn due to disagreements over property prices with the local government and farmers. With local governments often dependent on land sales to fund payments on a staggering 10.7 trillion yuan ($1.7 trillion) of debt, Beijing worries that a collapsing property market will trigger a wave of defaults that in turn will hit the banks. More worrisome, the property market, which contributes about 10 percent of Chinese growth and drives activity in 50 other sectors, could drag the real economy to a hard landing. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)